Mountain Bike Buddies

FAQ


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS


What is the best time of the year to ride in Southern Utah?  Spring (March through May) and Fall (September & October) are traditionally the “prime” times to come to Southern Utah.  In the Summer we ride early in the mornings and spend more time in the mountains (Brian Head & Bryce Canyon).

Is it better to stay in St George or Springdale?  Springdale at the entry to Zion N.P. is a beautiful place to stay.  However, if you are coming here to mountain bike, it really is better to stay in St George.   I don’t charge extra for picking people up in Springdale, but it really limits where, and how long we can ride.  (See how long do we ride question below).

Are there places to camp in the St George area?  Yes, there are campgrounds, in Zion N.P. Snow Canyon State Park, Sand Hollow State Park.  Also, there is rough camping at Red Cliffs Recreation area, and up on Gooseberry Mesa.  

Do you offer half day rates?  No, but I do offer “Ala Cart”  rates for riding just one trail. 

How long do we ride?    I am willing to start as early in the morning as you want.  However, I ask that we finish our last ride of the day by 4 p.m. so we can be back in St George by 5 p.m.   I realize this is your vacation and you want to cram in as much as possible…However, it’s my job, and I actually have a life apart from biking.  If you want to ride after 4 or 5 p.m. please arrange it with me beforehand, so that I don’t plan anything that evening, and I’ll give you a price for the additional time (usually $20/hour). 

What happens if the weather is bad?  There's not too many bad days in Southern Utah (not counting the heat).  Of course, if we cannot ride, you will not be charged. 

Here in the Western U.S. we cannot ride on muddy trails.  The mud sticks to bikes like concrete.  In five minutes your 20 pound bike will weigh over a hundred pounds and the wheels won’t turn.  But more importantly, one inconsiderate rider can ruin a trail for the entire year.  The local riders and BLM take this very seriously, and I can lose my permits for allowing my customers to ride on a wet trail.  Also, if muddy, the roads to Gooseberry, Little Creek, and Guacamole become impassable.  Especially, in the early spring, I would suggest you come prepared to do something else (hike, climb, road ride, golf, sight see), in case we can’t ride.

How far in advance should we book you?  Some people confuse what I do with the shuttle companies in Moab, where you just show up and they take you to the trail head.  Actually, what I do is more like a tour company where trips are booked weeks or months in advance.  Also, as many of you know, I have a very ill wife that lives in Salt Lake City, (300 miles north).  If I have even a couple of days where I am not booked, I go up there to spend time with her.  So, please book early, if you can.

What is the minimum and maximum number of riders you can take?  Two riders is the minimum.  Frankly, for what I charge, one rider doesn’t pay the gas.  Also, there are huge liability issues with letting someone ride alone.  If you are coming “solo” I am happy to take your name and let you know if something comes up.  11 riders is the maximum number of riders that will fit in my 12 passenger van.

Do you ever combine groups?  Yes, if it is a PERFECT match.  Usually, I won’t try to combine or add to a group if it is over four people.  If I do combine or add to a group, the people that reserved me first determine where we ride, what time we leave, etc.   It’s “their trip”.  

On overnight trips, who pays your expenses?   I do not charge extra for lodging or meals whether we are in St George or on the road.   

Do you ever ride with customers?  No.   Often in the spring and fall I am booked over 90 straight days.   Especially at my age, my body just can’t stand up to that type of beating.   Besides, I’m not sure you want an old, fat guy riding along, slowing you down.

Do you require a “Liability waiver”?    Yes, If you want a copy of the waiver, so you can read it before your trip, I am happy to email it to you.  It also protects the government (BLM & Forest Service).  Quite often while you are riding, a ranger will come around and check my permits and make sure I have signed waivers for everyone on the trail.  

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